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Abuse Reporting in North Carolina Back to Course Index

 

Abuse Reporting in North Carolina

 

Abuse is the physical, psychological, or sexual maltreatment of another person.  Several populations are vulnerable to abuse.

Domestic violence includes behaviors used by one person in a relationship to control the other.  These two people can be, or may not be, married.  Domestic violence can include husband against wife, wife against husband, brother against brother, or even roommate against a roommate.  It encompasses anyone in a close type of relationship.

Other types of abuse can be identified as disabled adult abuse, elder abuse, and child abuse.  The populations are especially vulnerable and frequently cannot speak for themselves.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines child maltreatment as any act or series of acts of commission or omission by a parent or other caregiver that results in harm, the potential for harm, or the threat of harm to a child. 

 

Elder abuse is a term referring to any knowing, intentional, or negligent act by a caregiver or any other person that causes harm or serious risk of harm to a vulnerable adult.

Currently, there are four widely recognized and identifiable categories of abuse, including:

  • Neglect
  • Physical Abuse
  • Psychological/Emotional Abuse
  • Sexual Abuse

 

Other types of abuse can fit under these categories, such as financial abuse and exploitation, as well.

 

Neglect is defined as a type of maltreatment that refers to the failure by the caregiver to provide needed, age-appropriate care, although financially able to do so or offered financial or other means to do so.

 

 

Types of neglect can include:

  • Physical neglect
  • Educational neglect
  • Emotional/Psychological neglect
  • Medical neglect

 

Example of child neglect:

Joan, a first-grade teacher, notices John is underweight and never brings money or food for lunch.  She knows the family has resources but never shows up for conferences or school events.  When she asks John, he says his parents both leave for work at 5:00 am and frequently forget to leave money or a lunch out.  He says he is not allowed to make his lunches. 

 

Example of disabled adult neglect:

Samantha is arrested for drug possession and neglects to tell the arresting officer that her 24-year-old sister with severe disabilities is home alone because she had only intended to be gone for an hour to obtain drugs.  Samantha is held overnight in jail until she plans to post bail.  The neighbors hear Samantha’s sister crying out and wandering the street looking for her at 2:00 am.  They call the police, who find the woman in the front yard in pajamas without shoes.

 

Example of elder neglect:

An 86-year-old man arrived at the emergency room from his son’s home with multiple bed sores all over his back, on his heels, and with severe dehydration.  He had restraint marks on his wrist.  His son said they felt like they had to restrain him, or he would wander off during the night.

 

Psychological abuse is also referred to as emotional abuse and is a form of abuse characterized by a person subjecting or exposing another to psychologically harmful behavior.  It involves the willful infliction of mental or emotional anguish by threat, humiliation, or other verbal and non-verbal conduct.  It is often associated with situations of power imbalance, such as abusive relationships.

Psychological abuse may occur as bullying of individuals by groups, often children, or it may be by one partner in a relationship.  In domestic abuse, psychological abuse nearly always precedes physical violence and also accompanies it.

Modern technology has led to new forms of abuse, particularly in children and young adults, through text messaging and online cyberbullying.  Methods of abuse include causing fear by intimidation, threatening physical harm to self, partner, children, or partner’s family or friends, destruction of pets and property, and forcing isolation from family, friends, or school or work.  More subtle tactics include put-downs, hiding objects such as keys, then putting them back without the victim seeing, and denial that previous incidents happened.

Examples of psychological abuse can include:

  • Put-downs
  • Threats to leave
  • Threats to take things away
  • Hiding keys
  • Locking the windows or doors to keep someone in

 

Physical abuse involves contact intended to cause feelings of intimidation, pain, injury, or other physical suffering or harm.

There are several indicators of physical abuse: 

  • Frequent physical injuries are attributed to being clumsy or accident-prone.
  • Injuries that do not seem to fit the explanation
  • Conflicting explanations
  • Patches of hair missing
  • Frequent absences
  • Awkward movements that suggest the person is in pain or sore
  • Flinching behavior

 

Sexual abuse is forcing undesired sexual behavior by one person upon another.  This also can involve using someone for sexual stimulation.  Sexual abuse can involve both touching and non-touching behaviors.

Abusers often do not use physical force but may use play, deception, threats, or other forms of coercion to engage their victims and maintain their silence.

 

Signs of sexual abuse in children:

  • An increase in nightmares and/or other sleeping difficulties
  • Withdrawn behavior
  • Angry outbursts
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Not wanting to be left alone with a particular person
  • Sexual knowledge, language, and/or behaviors that are inappropriate for the child’s age

Signs of sexual abuse in the elderly:

  • Bruising on inner thighs
  • Sexually transmitted diseases or infections
  • Any sudden change in personality
  • Acting overly compliant
  • Odd comments about sex or sexual behaviors
  • Agitation or aggression
  • Scared or timid behavior
  • Withdrawal and wanting to be alone

Although many people who have experienced sexual abuse show behavioral and emotional changes, many others do not.  It is critical to focus not only on detection but also on prevention and open communication.

Approximately 15% to 25% of women and 5% to 15% of men were sexually abused when they were children.  Most sexual abuse offenders are acquainted with their victims.  Approximately 30% are relatives, and approximately 60% are other acquaintances such as friends of the family, caretakers, or neighbors.

 

Reporting Abuse

There may be strong practical and moral reasons to report a crime; beyond that, sometimes, there is a legal duty.

Child Abuse

According to  North Carolina N.C.G.S. §7B-301, the Duty to report abuse, neglect, dependency, or death due to maltreatment:

Any person or institution who has cause to suspect that any juvenile is abused, neglected, or dependent, as defined N.C.G.S. §7B-101, or has died as the result of maltreatment, shall report the case of that juvenile to the director of the department of social services in the county where the juvenile resides or is found.”

This legislation intends to encourage reporting to the proper authority situations in which children may be at risk.  It does not require that the reporter possess any information beyond a cause to suspect abuse, neglect, and/or dependency.  The reporter is not required to have witnessed the abuse, neglect, and/or dependency or to have firsthand knowledge.

Reports should be made to the Director of the County Department of Social Services in the county in which the child or disabled adult resides or is found.  Reports may be made orally or in writing.

N.C.G.S. §7B-301B states that Any person or institution who knowingly or wantonly fails to report the case of a juvenile as required by subsection (a) of this section, or who knowingly or wantonly prevents another person from making a report as required by subsection (a) of this section, is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. 

The report should include pertinent information such as:

  • the name and address of the juvenile/disabled adult
  • the name and address of the juvenile/disabled adult’s caretaker
  • the age of the juvenile/disabled adult
  • the names and ages of other juveniles/disabled adults in the home
  • the present whereabouts of the juvenile/disabled adult
  • the nature and extent of any injury or condition resulting from abuse, neglect, or dependency and
  • any other information which the person making the report believes might be helpful

Duty to report in cases where it is suspected:

  • Child abuse and/or neglect by a parent, guardian, custodian, or caretaker. 
  • Abuse, neglect, or exploitation of a disabled or elder adult by their caretaker. 
  • Physicians and Hospitals must report to law enforcement certain kinds of wounds, injuries, or illnesses. 
  • School Principals must report immediately to law enforcement when he or she has personal or actual knowledge that an act has occurred on school property involving certain offenses. 
  • Photo processors or computer technicians who, within the scope of their employment, come across images of a minor (or one who reasonably appears to be a minor) engaging in sexual activity. 

Disabled Persons Abuse/Elder Abuse

The term “elder abuse” is not specifically defined in the North Carolina statutes.  There is one universal adult protective services requirement in North Carolina. 

Article 6, Chapter 108A of the North Carolina General Statutes requires that county departments of social services provide protection services for disabled adults who are alleged to be abused, neglected, or exploited and in need of protective services.  This protects disabled adults of any age from abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

NC state law offers extra protections to combat the financial exploitation of disabled adults and adults 65 and older. 

Abuse should be reported to the Department of Social Services in the county where the disabled or older adult lives.

It is important to note that according to North Carolina statute, a person may be physically or mentally incapacitated “as a result of mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy or autism, organic brain damage caused by advanced age or other physical degeneration in connection therewith; or due to conditions incurred at any age which are the result of an accident, organic brain damage, mental or physical illness, or continued consumption or absorption of substances.” 

According to  North Carolina N.C.G.S. §108A-102 

Everyone, without exception, who has reasonable cause to believe that a disabled adult needs protective services must report such information to the county department of social services.

(a)  Any person having reasonable cause to believe that a disabled adult needs protective services shall report such information to the director.

(b)  The report may be made orally or in writing.  The report shall include the name and address of the disabled adult, the name and address of the disabled adult’s caretaker, the age of the disabled adult; the nature and extent of the disabled adult’s injury or condition resulting from abuse or neglect; and other pertinent information.

(c) Anyone who makes a report under this statute, who testifies in any judicial proceeding arising from the report, or who participates in a required evaluation shall be immune from any civil or criminal liability on account of such report or testimony or participation unless such person acted in bad faith or with a malicious purpose.

Duty to report in cases where it is suspected:

  • willful infliction of physical pain, injury or mental anguish, unreasonable confinement, or the willful deprivation by a caretaker of services necessary to maintain mental and physical health
  • a disabled adult who is either living alone and not able to provide the services necessary to maintain mental or physical health (self-neglect), or who is not receiving services from his caretaker
  • illegal or improper use of a disabled adult or his resources for another’s profit or advantage

North Carolina has specific reporting requirements that apply to employees and volunteers at facilities providing services for people who are mentally ill, developmentally disabled, or substance abusers (MH/DD/SA facilities).  The new reporting requirements apply to situations involving certain types of criminal sex offenses, including rape and sexual assault.

G.S. 122C-3(14) states that any person at one location whose primary purpose is to provide services for the care, treatment, habilitation, or rehabilitation of individuals with mental illnesses or intellectual or other developmental disabilities or substance abusers, and includes all of the following:

a. An “area facility,” is a facility that is operated by or under contract with the area authority or county program.  For this subparagraph, a contract is a contract, memorandum of understanding, or other written agreement whereby the facility agrees to provide services to one or more clients of the area authority or county
program.  Area facilities may also be licensable facilities by Article 2 of this Chapter.  A State facility is not an area facility.
b. A “licensable facility,” which is a facility for one or more minors or for two or more adults that provides services to individuals who have mental illnesses or intellectual or other developmental disabilities or are substance abusers.  These services shall be day services offered to the same individual for three hours or more during 24 hours, or residential services provided for 24 consecutive hours or more.  Facilities for individuals who are substance abusers include chemical dependency facilities.
c. A “private facility,” which is a facility that is either a licensable facility or a special unit of a general hospital or a part of either in which the specific service provided is not covered under the terms of a contract with an area authority.
d. The psychiatric service of the University of North Carolina Hospitals at Chapel Hill.
e. A “residential facility,” which is a 24-hour facility that is not a hospital, including a group home.
f. A “State facility”, which is a facility that is operated by the Secretary. NC General Statutes – Chapter 122C Article 1 6
g. A “24-hour facility,” which is a facility that provides a structured living environment and services for 24 consecutive hours or more and includes hospitals that are facilities under this Chapter.
h. A Veterans Administration facility or part thereof that provides services for the care, treatment, habilitation, or rehabilitation of individuals with mental illnesses or intellectual or other developmental disabilities or
substance abusers.

Employees and volunteers of MH/DD SA facilities are required to make a report if they witness a client become a victim of one of the many crimes described in Articles 7A and 26 of Chapter 14 of N.C.  General Statutes.  Many of these crimes involve sexual violence or abuse, such as rape and sexual battery – but these sections of the law also include crimes such as adultery, indecent exposure, and secret peeping.

Many of the sexual offenses identified in this law would be considered abuse that the employees or volunteers are already required to report under these existing adult protective services and child protective services laws.  The state made changes to the existing law due to some abuse in facilities not being reported.

This law is more expansive, in that it requires the MH/DD/SA facility employee or volunteer to report allegations within 24 hours of witnessing the situation.  The other reporting laws do not impose similar time limitations.  It allows reports to be made to anyone the following: (1) DSS, (2) the district attorney, or (3) a law enforcement agency.  Existing laws discussed above require reports to be made to DSS and then impose duties on DSS to communicate with the district attorney and/or law enforcement officials.  Note this law does not eliminate or modify the existing adult or child protective services reporting laws.  Those reports must still be made to DSS.

This requirement likely extends beyond actions that would be considered abuse or neglect under the APS law, such as indecent exposure and secret peeping (although abuse can include willful infliction of mental anguish under the APS law).

Under this law, a facility employee or volunteer could be charged with a crime (Class A1 misdemeanor) for failing to make the required report.  There is a similar penalty that applies in the context of child abuse if a person or institution “knowingly or wantonly fails” to make a required report or prevents another person from making a required report (Class 1 misdemeanor).  There is not a comparable provision in the APS reporting law. 

 

Assessment of Abuse

What to Do if a Child Tells You They Have Been Abused or Neglected

  • Be aware of your feelings and remain calm and nonjudgmental
  • Find a private place to talk with the child
  • Keep the talk brief

    DO
    Let the child do the talking
    Let the child tell you, in their own words, what happened
    Give the child your undivided attention
    Ask for clarification if the child uses words that are not familiar
    Acknowledge the child’s feelings
    Take notes and try to report quotes from the child.

    DO NOT
    Interrogate the child
    Probe or press for answers
    Suggest answers
    Interrupt their story
    Ask “why” questions

Ask leading questions (such as yes or no questions).

 

Screening For Abuse And Safety Assessments

When screening for abuse, treat all individuals with dignity, respect, and compassion and with sensitivity to age, culture, ethnicity, and sexual orientation while recognizing that abuse is unacceptable. 

Screening should occur in all primary care settings with every individual.  Beyond this setting, any helping professions should be aware of the clinical findings that may indicate abuse.  If any are seen or heard, a conversation should be initiated.

 

 

Keep in mind:

  1. Screen in a safe environment.  Separate any accompanying persons from the patient when screening for abuse. 

  2. Use your own words in a non-threatening, non-judgmental way.

  3. Use questions that are direct, specific, and easy to understand.
  • Do you feel safe at home?
  • Have you ever been threatened or abused (physically, sexually, or emotionally) by someone?
  • Is there someone specific who is making you feel unsafe?
  1. Discuss with patients the confidentiality of these questions and the mandatory reporting of certain kinds of abuse.

Remember that the individual may deny abuse if they are not ready to deal with the situation or is in denial.

 

North Carolina Mandatory Reporting Requirements Children

 
QUESTION ANSWER

Who is required to report?

  • Any person or institution.

When is a report required, and where does it go?

When is a report required?

  • When any person has cause to suspect that any juvenile is abused, neglected, or dependent or has died as the result of maltreatment.

Where does it go?

  • The director of the department of social services in the county where the child resides or is found.
    • Information is available at https://www2.ncdhhs.gov/dss/cps/about.htm.

What definitions are important to know?

  • “Abused Juvenile” means any juvenile less than 18 years of age (i) who is found to be a minor victim of human trafficking under G.S. 14-43.15 or (ii) whose parent, guardian, custodian, or caretaker:
    • Inflicts or allows to be inflicted upon the juvenile a serious physical injury by other than accidental means;
    • Creates or allows to be created a substantial risk of serious physical injury to the juvenile by other than accidental means;
    • Uses or allows to be used upon the juvenile cruel or grossly inappropriate procedures or cruel or grossly inappropriate devices to modify behavior;
    • Commits, permits, or encourages the commission of certain crimes by, with, or upon the juvenile including rape, incest, prostitution, sexual assault or preparation or dissemination of obscene materials, or the unlawful sale, surrender, or purchase of the juvenile;
    • Creates or allows to be created serious emotional damage to the juvenile, as evidenced by a juvenile’s severe anxiety, depression, withdrawal, or aggressive behavior toward himself or others; or
    • Encourages, directs, or approves of delinquent acts involving moral turpitude committed by the juvenile.

This term includes any juvenile less than 18 years of age who is a victim or is alleged to be a victim of an offense under G.S. 14–43.11 (human trafficking), 14–43.12 (involuntary servitude), or 14–43.13 (sexual servitude), regardless of the relationship between the victim and the perpetrator.

  • “Caretaker” means any person other than a parent, guardian, or custodian who has responsibility for the health and welfare of a juvenile in a residential setting.  A person responsible for a juvenile’s health and welfare means a stepparent, foster parent, an adult member of the juvenile’s household, an adult relative entrusted with the juvenile’s care, a potential adoptive parent during a visit or trial placement with a juvenile in the custody of a department, any person such as house parent or cottage parent who has primary responsibility for supervising a juvenile’s health and welfare in a residential child care facility or residential educational facility, or any employee or volunteer of a division, institution, or school operated by the Department of Health and Human Services.  Nothing in the subdivision of the statute shall be construed to impose a legal duty of support under Chapter 50 or Chapter 110 of the General Statutes.  The duty imposed upon a caretaker as defined shall be for the corresponding subchapter only.
  • “Custodian” means the person or agency that has been awarded legal custody of a juvenile by a court.
  • “Dependent Juvenile” means a juvenile in need of assistance or placement because the juvenile has no parent, guardian, or custodian responsible for the juvenile’s care or supervision or whose parent, guardian, or custodian is unable to provide for the care or supervision and lacks an appropriate alternative child care arrangement. 
    • In determining whether a juvenile is dependent, the trial court must address both (1) the parent’s ability to provide care or supervision, and (2) the availability to the parent of alternative child care arrangements.  In re L.H., 2011 WL 879973.
  • “Juvenile” means a person under the age of 18 who is not married, emancipated, or a member of the U.S. Armed Forces.
  • Neglected juvenile” means any juvenile less than 18 years of age (i) who is found to be a minor victim of human trafficking under G.S. 14-43.15 or (ii) whose parent, guardian, custodian, or caretaker does not provide proper care, supervision, or discipline; or who has been abandoned; or who is not provided necessary medical care; or who is not provided necessary remedial care; or who lives in an environment injurious to the juvenile’s welfare; or the custody of who has been unlawfully transferred under G.S. 14-321.2; or who has been placed for care or adoption in violation of the law.  In determining whether a juvenile is a neglected juvenile, it is relevant whether that juvenile lives in a home where another juvenile has died as a result of suspected abuse or neglect or lives in a home where another juvenile has been subjected to abuse or neglect by an adult who regularly lives in the home.
  • “Serious neglect” means conduct, behavior, or inaction of the juvenile’s parent, guardian, custodian, or caretaker that evidences a disregard of consequences of such magnitude that the conduct, behavior, or inaction constitutes an unequivocal danger to the juvenile’s health, welfare or safety but does not constitute abuse.

What timing and procedural requirements apply to reports?

  • Reports may be made orally, by telephone, or in writing.
  • If the report is made orally or by telephone, the reporter must give his or her name, address, and telephone number, although the refusal of the reporter to give a name shall not preclude the department’s assessment of the alleged abuse, neglect, dependency, or death as a result of maltreatment.

What information must a report include?

  • The name and address of the juvenile;
  • The name and address of the juvenile’s parent, guardian, or caretaker;
  • The age of the juvenile;
  • The names and ages of other juveniles in the home;
  • The present whereabouts of the juvenile if not at the home address;
  • The nature and extent of any injury or condition resulting from abuse, neglect, or dependency; and
  • Any other information which the person making the report believes might help establish the need for protective services or court intervention.

Anything else I should know?

  • In addition to the obligation above to report to the department of social services, a physician must report cases involving recurrent illness or serious physical injury to any child under the age of 18 years where the illness or injury appears, in the physician’s professional judgment, to be the result of non-accidental trauma as soon as it becomes practicable before, during, or after completion of treatment.
    • If the case is treated in a hospital, sanitarium, or other medical institution or facility, the report shall be made by the Director, Administrator, or other person designated by the Director or Administrator of the medical institution or facility, or if the case is treated elsewhere, the report shall be made by the physician or surgeon treating the case to the chief of police or the police authorities of the city or town in North Carolina in which the hospital or other institution or place of treatment is located.
    • If the hospital or other institution or place of treatment is located outside the corporate limits of a city or town, then the report shall be made by the proper person in the manner set forth above to the sheriff of the respective county or one of the sheriff’s deputies.
  • The department of social services shall disclose confidential information regarding the identity of the reporter to any federal, state, or local government entity or its agent with a court order.
    • The department may only disclose confidential information regarding the identity of the reporter to a federal, state, or local government entity or its agent without a court order when the entity demonstrates a need for the reporter’s name to carry out the entity’s mandated responsibilities.
  • Any physician or administrator of a hospital, clinic, or another medical facility to which a suspected abused juvenile is brought for medical diagnosis or treatment shall have the right, when authorized by the chief district court judge of the district or the judge’s designee, to retain physical custody of the juvenile in the facility when the physician who examines the juvenile certifies in writing that the juvenile who is suspected of being abused should remain for medical treatment or that, according to the juvenile’s medical evaluation, it is unsafe for the juvenile to return to the juvenile’s parent, guardian, custodian, or caretaker. 
    • The right to retain custody in the facility shall exist for up to 12 hours from the time and date contained in the written certification.
  • Any person or institution who knowingly or wantonly fails to report or knowingly or wantonly prevents another person from making a report is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.
  • Anyone who makes a report cooperates with the county department of social services in a protective services assessment testifies in any judicial proceeding resulting from a protective services report or assessment, or otherwise participates in the program authorized by the statute is immune from any civil or criminal liability that might otherwise be incurred or imposed for that action provided that the person was acting in good faith.  In any proceeding involving liability, good faith is presumed.
  • No privilege shall be grounds for any person or institution failing to report that a juvenile may have been abused, neglected, or dependent, even if the knowledge or suspicion is acquired in an official professional capacity, except when the knowledge or suspicion is gained by an attorney from that attorney’s client during representation only in the abuse, neglect, or dependency case.  No privilege, except the attorney-client privilege, shall be grounds for excluding evidence of abuse, neglect, or dependency in any judicial proceeding (civil, criminal, or juvenile) in which a juvenile’s abuse, neglect, or dependency is in issue nor any judicial proceeding resulting from a report submitted under the statute, both as the privilege relates to the competency of the witness and the exclusion of confidential communications.

Statutory citation(s):

  • N.C. Gen. Stat. §§ 7B-101, 7B-301, 7B-302, 7B-308, 7B-309, 7B-310, 90-21.20.

 

North Carolina Mandatory Reporting Requirements:  Elderly and Disabled

 
QUESTION ANSWER

Who is required to report?

  • Any person.

When is a report required, and where does it go?

When is a report required?

  • Reasonable cause to believe that a disabled adult needs protective services.

Where does it go?

What definitions are important to know?

  • “Abuse” means the willful infliction of physical pain, injury or mental anguish, unreasonable confinement, or the willful deprivation by a caretaker of services that are necessary to maintain mental and physical health.
    • Whether “spankings or beatings” of a “disabled adult” amount to abuse within the meaning of the Protection of the Abused, Neglected, or Exploited Disabled Adult Act depends on the circumstances under which such spankings or beatings are administered.
  • “Caretaker” means an individual who has the responsibility for the care of the disabled adult as a result of a family relationship or who has assumed the responsibility for the care of the disabled adult voluntarily or by contract.
  • “Disabled adult” means any person 18 years of age or older, or any lawfully emancipated minor, who is present in North Carolina and who is physically or mentally incapacitated due to an intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, or autism; organic brain damage caused by advanced age or other physical degeneration in connection therewith; or due to conditions incurred at any age which are the result of an accident, organic brain damage, mental or physical illness, or continued consumption or absorption of substances.
  • Emergency” refers to a situation where (i) the disabled adult is in substantial danger of death or irreparable harm if protective services are not provided immediately, (ii) the disabled adult is unable to consent to services, and (iii) no responsible, able, or willing caretaker is available to consent to emergency services, and (iv) there is insufficient time to utilize procedure provided in G.S. 108A-105.
  • Emergency services” refer to those services necessary to maintain the person’s vital functions and without which there is a reasonable belief that the person would suffer irreparable harm or death.  This may include taking physical custody of the disabled person.
  • “Essential services” means those social, medical, psychiatric, psychological, or legal services necessary to safeguard the disabled adult’s rights and resources and to maintain the physical or mental well-being of the individual.  These services shall include, but not be limited to, the provision of medical care for physical and mental health needs, assistance in personal hygiene, food, clothing, adequately heated and ventilated shelter, protection from health and safety hazards, protection from physical mistreatment, and protection from exploitation.  The words “essential services” shall not include taking the person into physical custody without his consent except as provided for in G.S. 108A-106 and Chapter 122C of the General Statutes.
  • “Exploitation” means the illegal or improper use of a disabled adult or his resources for another’s profit or advantage.
  • A disabled adult is “in need of protective services” if that person, due to physical or mental incapacity, is unable to perform or obtain for himself “essential services” and if that person is without able, responsible, and willing persons to perform or obtain for his “essential services.”
  • “Cannot consent” means lacks sufficient understanding or capacity to make or communicate responsible decisions concerning his person, including but not limited to provisions for health or mental health care, food, clothing, or shelter, because of physical or mental incapacity.  This may be reasonably determined by the director, or he may seek a physician’s or psychologist’s assistance in making this determination.
  • “Neglect” means a disabled adult who is either living alone and not able to provide for himself or herself the services which are necessary to maintain the person’s mental or physical health or is not receiving services from the person’s caretaker.  A person is not receiving services from his caretaker if, among other things and not by way of limitation, the person is a resident of a State-owned facility and the person is, in the opinion of the professional staff of that State-owned facility, mentally incompetent to give consent to medical treatment, the person has no legal guardian, and the person needs medical treatment.
  • “Protective services” means services provided by the State or other government or private organizations or individuals which are necessary to protect the disabled adult from abuse, neglect, or exploitation.  They shall consist of an evaluation of the need for service and mobilization of essential services on behalf of the disabled adult.

What timing and procedural requirements apply to reports?

  • Timing not specified.  Reports may be made orally or in writing.

What information must a report include?

  • The name and address of the disabled adult;
  • The name and address of the disabled adult’s caretaker;
  • The age of the disabled adult;
  • The nature and extent of the disabled adult’s injury or condition resulting from abuse or neglect; and
  • Any other “pertinent information.”

Anything else I should know?

  • Anyone who makes a report under the mandatory reporting statute, who testifies in any judicial proceeding arising from the report, or who participates in a required evaluation shall be immune from any civil or criminal liability on account of such report or testimony or participation unless such person acted in bad faith or with a malicious purpose.

Statutory citation(s):

N.C. Gen. Stat. §§ 108A-101, 108A-102.

Conclusion

Approximately 10% of the elderly population is abused in the United States.  There were 119,339 children with investigated reports of possible abuse and neglect in North Carolina in the twelve months before June of 2018 (latest data available).  Twenty-seven children died at the hand of a parent or caregiver in North Carolina in 2016 (the latest data available).  The problem is prevalent and serious.

It is important to take into account the effects of traumatic stress on victims of abuse and on their ability to recount the abusive event.  With children and the elderly, there is also, at times, difficulty in communicating what they are going through.  Please be vigilant to recognize the signs of abuse.  Victims frequently feel afraid of the offender or feel shame about the abuse.  Many will be incapable of telling about their situation.

We all share a responsibility to protect children and vulnerable adults from harm.

 

DIRECTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY DEPARTMENTS OF SOCIAL SERVICES
Last Updated: January 9, 2020


01.  Alamance County DSS
319 North Graham Hopedale Road, Suite C
Burlington, NC 27217
Main Number: 336-570-6532
Emergency Number: 336-229-2912
CPS Number: 336-229-2908
APS Number: 336-229-2909
Fax Number: 336-570-6538

02.  Alexander County DSS
604 7th Street, SW
Taylorsville, NC 28681
Main Number: 828-632-1080
Emergency (Sheriff’s Dept.): 828-632-4658
APS Number: 828-352-7670
Medicaid Transportation: 828-465-7641
Fax Number: 828-632-1092

03.  Alleghany County DSS
182 Doctor Street
Sparta, NC 28675
Post Office Box 247
Main Number: 336-372-2411
CPS/APS Number: 336-372-1445
Fax #336-372-2635

04.  Anson County DSS
118 North Washington Street
Wadesboro, NC 28170
Tel. #704-694-9351
Fax #704-695-1608

05.  Ashe County DSS
150 Government Circle, Suite 1400
Jefferson, NC 28640
Main Number: 336-846-5719
Emergency Number: 336-846-5600
CPS: 336-982-7800
APS: 336-846-5644
Fax #336-846-5779

06.  Avery County DSS
175 Linville Street
Newland, NC 28657
Post Office Box 309
Main Number: 828-733-8230
Fax #828-733-8245

07.  Beaufort County DSS
632 West 5th Street
Washington, NC 27889
Post Office Box 1358
Main Number: 252-975-5500
CPS: 252-940-6100, 252-940-6030, 252-940-6089
APS: 252-940-6042
Fax #252-975-5555

08.  Bertie County DSS
1006 Wayland Street
Windsor, NC 27983
Post Office Box 627
Main Number: 252-794-5320
Emergency Phone: 252-794-5300
CPS/APS: 252-794-5330
Fax Number: 252-794-5344

09.  Bladen County DSS
208 McKay Street
Elizabethtown, NC 28337
Post Office Box 369
Main Number: 910-862-6800
CPS: 910-862-6876
APS: 910-862-6893
Fax #910-862-6801

10.  Brunswick County DSS
60 Government Drive, NE
Bolivia, NC 28422-0219
Post Office Box 219
Main Number: 910-253-2077
Fax Number: 910-253-2071
CPS/APS: 910-253-2415
Medicaid Transportation: 910-253-2247

11.  Buncombe County DSS
40 Coxe Avenue
Asheville, NC 28802
Post Office Box 7408
Main Number: 828-250-5500
CPS: 828-250-5900
APS: 828-250-5800
Medicaid Transportation: 828-552-5486
Fax Number: 828-250-6235

12.  Burke County DSS
700 East Parker Road
Morganton, NC 28680-0549
Post Office Box Drawer 549
Main Number: 828-764-9600
Fax Number: 828-764-9793

13.  Cabarrus County DSS
1303 South Cannon Boulevard
Kannapolis, NC 28083
Main Number: 704-920-1400 Medicaid
Transportation: 704-920-2246 Fax
Number: 704-920-1401

14.  Caldwell County DSS
2345 Morganton Blvd SW, Suite A
Lenoir, NC 28645
Main Number: 828-426-8200
CPS Number: 828-426-8257
APS Number: 828-426-8288
Medicaid Transportation: 828-426-8256
Fax Number: 828-426-8398

15.  Camden County DSS
117 North Highway 343
Camden, NC 27921
Post Office Box 70
Main Number: #252-331-4787
Emergency Phone: 252-331-1500
Fax Number: 252-335-1009

16.  Carteret County DSS
Post Office Box 779
210 Craven Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
Main Number: 252-728-3181
Emergency Phone: 252-728-3181
Fax Number: 252-728-3631
Courier Number: 11-14-24

17.  Caswell County DSS
Post Office Box 1538
175 County Park Road
Yanceyville, NC 27379
Main Number: 336-694-4141
CPS: 336-694-2032, 336-694-2054
APS: 336-694-2008
Fax 336-694-1816

18.  Catawba County DSS
Newton, NC 28658
3030 11th Avenue Drive, SE
Hickory, NC 28602
Post Office Box 669
Main Number: 828-695-5600
CPS: 828-324-9111
APS: 828-695-5609
Medicaid Transportation: 828-695-5608
Fax Number: 828-695-2497

19.  Chatham County DSS
Post Office Box 489
102 Camp Drive
Pittsboro, NC 27312
Main Number: 919-542-2759
Emergency Phone: 919-542-2911
CPS: 919-542-2759
Fax 919-542-6355

20.  Cherokee County DSS
4800 W US Highway 64
Murphy, NC 28906
Main Number: 828-837-7455
CPS: 828-835-3144
Fax 828-837-9789

21.  Chowan County DSS
100 W. Freemason Circle
Edenton, NC 27932
Main Number: 252-482-7441
Fax Number: 252-482-7041

22.  Clay County DSS
Post Office Box 147
119 Courthouse Dr.
Hayesville, NC 28904
Main Number: 828-389-6301
Fax Number: 828-389-6427

23.  Cleveland County DSS
PO Drawer 9006, Shelby NC 28151-9006
130 South Post Road
Shelby, NC 28150
Main Number: 704-487-0661
Fax Number: 704-484-1051

24.  Columbus County DSS
40 Government Complex Road
Whiteville, NC 28472-0397
PO Box 397
Main Number: 910-642-2800
Fax Number: 910-641-3970
CPS: 910-641-3235
APS: (910)641-3227
Medicaid Transportation: 910-642-7201
Fax 910-641-3970
Courier Number: 04-21-23

25.  Craven County DSS
2818 Neuse Boulevard
Post Office Box 12039
New Bern, NC 28561-2039
Main Number: 252-636-4900
Fax Number: 252-636-4946
CPS/APS:252-633-2357
Medicaid Transportation: 252-636-4917Courier
Number: 16-66-02

26.  Cumberland County DSS
1225 Ramsey Street
Post Office Box 2429
Fayetteville, NC 28301
Main Number: 910-323-1540
Fax Number: 910-677-2801
Emergency Phone: 910-323-1500
CPS: 910-677-2450
APS: 910-677-2389
Medicaid Transportation: 910-677-2526

27.  Currituck County DSS
153 Courthouse Rd., Suite 400
Currituck, NC 27929
Main Number: 252-232-3083
Fax Number: 252-232-2167

28.  Dare County DSS
Post Office Box 669
107 Exeter Street
Manteo, NC 27954
Main Number: 252-475-5500
Fax Number: 252-473-9824
Emergency Phone: 252-473-3444

29.  Davidson County DSS
Post Office Box 788
Lexington, NC 27293
913 Greensboro Street
Main Number: 336-242-2500
Fax Number: 336-249-7588
Emergency Phone: 336-249-0131
Medicaid Transportation: 336-242-2272

30.  Davie County DSS
228 Hospital St
Post Office Box 517
Mocksville, NC 27028
Main Number: 336-753-6250
Fax Number: 336-751-1639

31.  Duplin County DSS
423 North Main Street
Post Office Box 969
Kenansville, NC 28349
Main Number: 910-296-2200
Fax Number: 910-296-2323
Emergency Phone: 910-271-4985
Medicaid Transportation: 910-296-2333

32.  Durham County DSS
414 East Main Street
Post Office Box 810
Durham, NC 27702-0810
Main Number: 919-560-8000
Fax Number: 919-560-8102
Emergency Phone: 911
CPS: 919-560-8424
APS: 919-560-8588
Medicaid Transportation: 919-560-0520

33.  Edgecombe County DSS
122 E. St. James Street
PO Box 370
Tarboro, NC 27886
Main Number: 252-641-7611
Fax Number: 252-641-7980
CPS/APS: 252-641-7668
Medicaid Transportation: 252-972-1174
Rocky Mount Office
301 South.  Fairview Road
Rocky Mount, NC 27801
Main Number: 252-985-4101
Fax Number: 252-985-1615

34.  Forsyth County DSS
741 North Highland Avenue
Winston-Salem, NC 27101
Main Number: 336-703-3800
Fax Number: 336-727-2850
CPS: 336-703-2287
APS: 336-703-3503

35.  Franklin County DSS
107 Industrial Drive
Post Office Box 669
Louisburg, NC 27549
Main Number: 919 496-5721
Fax Number: 919 496-8137
Emergency Phone: 911

36.  Gaston County DSS
330 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Way
Gastonia, NC 28052
Main Number: 704-862-7500
Fax Number: 704-862-7885
CPS: 704-862-7555
APS: 704-862-7575
Medicaid Transportation: 704-866-3206

37.  Gates County DSS
Post Office Box 185
200 Court Street
Gatesville, NC 27938
Main Number: 252-357-0075
Fax Number: 252-357-2132
Emergency Phone: 252-357-0210
Medicaid Transportation: 252-357-GITS (4487)

38.  Graham County DSS
196 Knight Street
Post Office Box 1150
Robbinsville, NC 28771
Main Number: 828-479-7911
Fax Number: 828-479-7928

39.  Granville County DSS
Post Office Box 966
410 West Spring Street
Oxford, NC 27565
Main Number: 919-693-1511
Fax Number: 919-603-5090
Medicaid Transportation: 919-603-3320

40.  Greene County DSS
227 Kingold Boulevard, Suite A
Snow Hill, NC 28580
Main Number: 252-747-5932
Fax Number: 252-747-8654
Emergency Phone: 252-747-7553
Medicaid Transportation: 252-747-8474

41.  Guilford County DSS
Post Office Box 3388
1203 Maple Street (27405)
Greensboro, NC 27402-3388
Main Number: 336-641-3447
Fax Number: 336-641-5647, 336-641-6067
Emergency Phone: 800-378-5315
CPS: 336-641-3795
APS: 336-641-3137
Medicaid Transportation: 336-641-2561

42.  Halifax County DSS
4421 Hwy 301
Post Office Box 76
7 Halifax, NC 27839
Main Number: 252-536-2511
Fax Number: 252-536-2432
CPS: 252-536-6500
APS: 252-536-6536
Medicaid Transportation: 252-538-6720

43.  Harnett County DSS
311 Cornelius Harnett Boulevard
Lillington, NC 27546
Main Number: 910-893-7500
Fax Number: 910-893-6604
CPS: 910-893-9111, 910-814-6662
APS: 910-814-6640

44.  Haywood County DSS
157 Paragon Parkway, Suite 300
Clyde, NC 28721
Main Number: 828-452-6620
Fax Number: 828-452-6690
Emergency Phone: 828-452-6600
APS: 828-452-6620, Option 1
Medicaid Transportation: 828-452-6620, Option 3

45.  Henderson County DSS
1200 Spartanburg Highway, Suite 300
Hendersonville, NC 28792
Main Number: 828-697-5500
Fax Number: 828-697-4544
CPS: 828-697-5572

46.  Hertford County DSS
704 King Street
Post Office Box 218
Winton, NC 27986
Main Number: 252-358-7830
Fax Number: Winton Office 252-358-0597
Ahoskie Office 252-332-4710

47.  Hoke County DSS
314 S. Magnolia Street
Post Office Box 340
Raeford, NC 28376
Main Number: 910-875-8725
Fax Number: 910-848-3828
Emergency Phone: 911
CPS/APS: 910-878-1988
Medicaid Transportation: 910-875-8588

48.  Hyde County DSS
35015 US Hwy 264
Post Office Box 100
Engelhard, NC 27824
Main Number: 252-926-4199
Fax Number: 252-926-3711
Medicaid Transportation: 252-926-1637

49.  Iredell County DSS
Post Office Box 1146
Statesville, NC 28687
549 Eastside Drive
Statesville, NC 28625
Main Number: 704-873-5631
Fax Number: 704-878-5419

50.  Jackson County DSS
15 Griffin Street
Sylva, NC 28779
Main Number: 828-586-5546
Fax Number: 828-586-6270, 828-587-2099
Emergency Phone: 828-586-1911

51.  Johnston County DSS
Post Office Box 911
714 North Street
Smithfield, NC 27577
Main Number: 919 989-5300
Fax Number: 919-989-5324

52.  Jones County DSS
118 Highway 58 North
Post Office Box 250
Trenton, NC 28585
Main Number: 252-448-2581
Fax Number: 252-488-5651
Emergency Phone: 252-559-6118

53.  Lee County DSS
530 Carthage Street
Post Office Box 1066
Sanford, NC 27330
Main Number: 919-718-4690
Fax: 919-718-4634
Emergency Phone: 919-718-4560 (Sheriff’s
Office)
Medicaid Transportation: 919-776-7201

54.  Lenoir County DSS
130 West King Street, Kinston, NC 28501
Post Office Box 6
Kinston, NC 28502-0006
Main Number: 252-559-6400
Fax Number: 252-559-6381
Emergency Phone: 252-559-8331
Nights/Weekends 252-559-6118

55.  Lincoln County DSS
1136 East Main Street
Post Office Box 130
Lincolnton, NC 28093-0130
Main Number: 704-732-0738
Fax Number: 704-736-8727
CPS: 704-736-8678
APS: 704-732-1969
Medicaid Transportation: 704-736-2030

56.  Macon County DSS
Lakeside Government Complex
1832 Lakeside Drive
Franklin, NC 28734
Main Number: 828-349-2124
Fax Number: 828-349-2401
Emergency Phone: 828-524-2811
Medicaid Transportation: 828-349-2222

57.  Madison County DSS
Post Office Box 219
5707 U.S. Highway 25/70, Unit D
Marshall, NC 28753
Main Number: 828-649-2711
Fax Number: 828-649-2097, 828-649-3687
Emergency Phone: 828-649-2721

58.  Martin County DSS
305 East Main Street
Post Office Box 809
Williamston NC 27892
Main Number: 252-789-4400
Fax Number: 252-789-4409
CPS/APS/Medicaid Transportation: 252-789-
4460

59.  McDowell County DSS
145 East Court Street
Post Office Box 338
Marion, NC 28752
Main Number: 828-652-3355
Emergency Phone: 828-652-4000
Medicaid Transportation: 828-659-0634

60. Mecklenburg County DSS
301 Billingsley Road
Post Office Box 220999
Charlotte, NC 28222
Main Number: 704-336-3000
Fax Number: 704-353-1325
Report Abuse (Child Protective Services): 980-
31-HELPS (43577)
Report Abuse (Adult Protective Services): 704-
336-CARE (2273)

61.  Mitchell County DSS
347 Long View Drive
Bakersville, NC 28705-0365
102 East Spring Street
Main Number: 828-688-2175
Fax Number: 828-688-4940
Emergency Phone: 828-688-9110 or 828-688-
9974
CPS: 828-688-2175 ext. 1538
APS: 828-688-2175, ext. 1544
Medicaid Transportation: 828-688-4715

62.  Montgomery County DSS
102 E. Spring Street
Post Office Drawer N
Troy, NC 27371
Main Number: 910-576-6531
Fax Number: 910-576-5016
Emergency Phone: 910-572-1313

63.  Moore County DSS
1036 Carriage Oaks Drive
Post Office Box 938
Carthage, NC 28327
Main Number: 910-947-2436
Fax Number: 910-947-1618
CPS/APS: 910-947-5683
Medicaid Transportation: 910-947-3389

64.  Nash County DSS
120 West Washington Street
Post Office Drawer 819
Nashville, NC 27856
Main Number: 252-459-9818
Fax Number: 252-459-9833
CPS: 252-459-1293
APS: 252-462-2711
Medicaid Transportation: 252-459-2731

65.  New Hanover County DSS
1650 Greenfield Street
Post Office Drawer 1559
Wilmington, NC 28402
Main Number: 910-798-3400
Fax Number: 910-798-7824
Emergency Phone: 911
CPS/APS: 910-798-3420
Medicaid Transportation: 910-798-3482

66.  New Hanover County DSS
1650 Greenfield Street
Post Office Drawer 1559
Wilmington, NC 28402
Main Number: 910-798-3400
Emergency Phone: 911
CPS/APS: 910-798-3420
Medicaid Transportation: 910-798-3482
Fax Number: 910-798-7824

67.  Northampton County DSS
9467 NC 305 Highway
Post Office Box 157
Jackson, NC 27845
Main Number: 252-534-5811
Emergency Phone: 252-534-1773, 252-534-
1246
Fax Number: 252-534-0061

68.  Onslow County DSS
1915 Onslow Drive Extension
Post Office Box 1379
Jacksonville, NC 28541
Main Number: 910-455-4145
Emergency Phone: 910-455-3113
CPS: 910-219-1955
APS: 910-989-0230
Medicaid Transportation: 910-989-3013
Fax Number: 910 219-4983
Courier Number: 11-08-20

69.  Orange County DSS
113 Mayo St.
PO Box 811
Hillsborough, NC 27278
Main Number: 919-245-2800
Emergency Phone: 919-732-8181
Medicaid Transportation: 919-717-1853
Fax Number: 919-644-3005

70.  Pamlico County Human Services Center
828 Alliance Main St.
Bayboro, NC 28515
Main Number: 252-745-4086
Fax Number: 252-745-7384

71.  Pasquotank County DSS
709 Roanoke Avenue
Elizabeth City, NC 27909
Main Number: 252-338-2126
Fax Number: 252-338-7512

72.  Pender County DSS
810 South Walker Street
Post Office Drawer 1207
Burgaw, NC 28425
Main Number: 910-259-1240
Emergency Phone: 910-259-1212
Fax Number: 910-259-1418

73. Perquimans County DSS
103 Charles Street
Hertford, NC 27944
Post Office Box 107
Main Number: 252-426-7373
Fax Number: 252-426-1240

74.  Person County DSS
355B S. Madison Blvd
Roxboro, NC 27573
Post Office Box 770
Main Number: 336-599-8361
Emergency Phone: 336-597-0500
Medicaid Transportation: 336-597-1771
Fax Number: 336-597-9339

75.  Pitt County DSS
1717 West Fifth Street
Greenville, NC 27834
Main Number: 252-902-1110
Emergency Phone: 252-830-4141
CPS/APS: 252-902-1111
Medicaid Transportation: 252-902-1101
Fax Number: 252-413-1299

76.  Polk County DSS
231 Wolverine Trail.
Mill Spring, NC 28756
Main Number: 828-894-2100
Emergency Phone: 828-894-3001
Medicaid Transportation: 828-894-8203
Fax Number: 828-894-6326

77.  Randolph County DSS
1512 North Fayetteville Street
P.O. Box 3239
Asheboro, NC 27204-3239
Main Number: 336-683-8000
CPS: 336-683-8101
APS: 336-683-8028
Medicaid Transportation: 336-629-7433
Fax Number: 336-683-8131

78.  Richmond County DSS
125 Caroline Street
Post Office Box 518
Rockingham, NC 28380
Main Number: 910-997-8480
Emergency Phone: 910-997-8283
CPS: 910-997-8400
APS/Medicaid Transportation: 910-997-8450
Fax #910-997-8447

79.  Robeson County DSS
120 Glen Cowan Road
Lumberton, NC 28360
Main Number: 910-671-3500
CPS: 910-671-3564
APS: 910-671-3168
Medicaid Transportation: 910-671-3705
Fax Number: 910-671-3092

80.  Rockingham County DSS
411 NC Hwy. 65
Wentworth, NC 27375
Post Office Box 61
Wentworth, NC 27375
Main Number: 336-342-1394
Emergency Phone: 336-342-8100
CPS: 336-342-3537
APS: 336-342-1394 ext. 7168
Fax #336-634-1847

81.  Rowan County DSS
1813 E. Innes Street
Salisbury, NC 28146
Main Number: 704-216-8330
CPS Number: 704-216-8499
Medicaid Transportation: 704-216-8331
Fax Number: 704-638-3134

82.  Rutherford County DSS
389 Fairground Road
PO Box 242
Spindale, NC 28160
Main Number: 828-287-6165
Emergency Phone: 828-229-7205
Medicaid Transportation: 828-287-6141
Fax Number: 828-287-6350

83.  Sampson County DSS
360 County Complex Rd. Suite 100
Clinton, NC 28328
Main Number: 910-592-7131
CPS Number: 910-592-4200
Medicaid Transportation: 910-299-0127
Fax Number: 910-592-4297
DIRECTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY DEPARTMENTS OF SOCIAL
SERVICES Last Updated: January 9, 2020

84.  Scotland County DSS
1405 West Boulevard
Post Office Box 1647
Laurinburg, NC 28353
Main Number: 910-277-2500
APS: 910-277-2525 ext. 3366
Medicaid Transportation: 910-277-2416
Fax Number: 910-277-2402

85.   Stanly County DSS
1000 North First Street, Suite 2
Albemarle, NC 28001
Main Number: 704-982-6100
Emergency Phone: 704-986-3700
Medicaid Transportation: 704-986-2011, 704-
986-2038
Fax #704-983-5818

86.  Stokes County DSS
1010 N. Main Street
Post Office Box 30
Danbury, NC 27016
Main Number: 336-593-2861
Fax Number: 336-593-9362
Emergency Phone: 800-672-2851

87.  Surry County DSS
118 Hamby Road
Dobson, NC 27017
Main Number: 336-401-8700
Emergency Phone: 336-374-3000
CPS/APS: 336-401-8800
Fax #336-401-8750

88.  Swain County DSS
80 Academy St.
Post Office Box 610
Bryson City, NC 28713
Main Number: 828-488-6921
Emergency Phone: 828-488-4844
Fax Number: 828-488-8271

89.  Transylvania County DSS
106 E. Morgan St.
Brevard, NC 28712
Main Number: 828-884-3174
Medicaid Transportation: 828-884-3283 Fax
Number: 828-884-3263

90.  Tyrrell County DSS
102 N. Road Street
Post Office Box 599
Columbia, NC 27925
Main Number: 252-796-3421
Emergency Phone: 252-796-2251
Fax Number: 252-796-1732

91.  Union County DSS
2330 Concord Avenue
Monroe, NC 28110
Main Number: 704-296-4300
Emergency Phone: 704-289-1591
CPS: 704-296-6124
Fax #704-296-6151

92.  Vance County DSS
350 Ruin Creek Road
Henderson, NC 27536
Main Number: 252-492-5001
CPS: 252-436-0407
APS: 252-492-5001
Medicaid Transportation: 252-492-5001 ext.
3257
Fax #252-438-5997

93.  Wake County Human Services
220 Swinburne Road
Post Office Box 46833
Raleigh, NC 27620-6833
Main Number: 919-212-7000
Emergency Phone: 919-212-7990
CPS: 919-212-7990 (English), 919-212-7963(Spanish)
APS: 919-212-7264
Medicaid Transportation: 919-212-7005
Fax #919-212-7285

94.  Warren County DSS
307 North Main Street
Warrenton, NC 27589
Main Number: 252-257-5000
CPS: 252-257-5007
Medicaid Transportation: 252-257-5014
Fax Number: 252-257-4656

95.  Washington County DSS
209 East Main Street
Plymouth, NC 27962
Post Office Box 10
Main Number: 252-793-4041
Medicaid Transportation: 252-793-4041 ext.255
Fax Number: 252-793-3195

96.  Watauga County DSS
132 Poplar Grove Road Connector, Suite C
Boone, NC 28607
Main Number: 828-265-8100
Fax Number: 828-265-7638

97.  Wayne County DSS
301 North Herman Street
Goldsboro, NC 27530
Main Number: 919-580-4034
Emergency Phone: 919-705-1774 (CPS Hotline)
Medicaid Transportation: 919-705-1956
Fax Number: 919-731-1293

98.  Wilkes County DSS
304 College Street
Wilkesboro, NC 28697
Main Number: 336-651-7400
Fax Number: 336-651-7568

99.  Wilson County DSS
100 N.E Gold Street
Wilson, NC 27894-0459
Post Office Box 459
Main Number: 252-206-4000
Emergency Phone: 252-237-8300
Medicaid Transportation: 252-206-4105
Fax Number: 252-237-1544

100.  Yadkin County DSS
Post Office Box 548
250 Willow Street
Yadkinville, NC 27055
Main Number: 336-69-4210
CPS/APS: 336-849-7910
Medicaid Transportation: 336-849-7910 ext.
7521 or 7558
Fax Number: 336-679-2664

101.  Yancey County DSS
320 Pensacola Road
Burnsville, NC 28714
Post Office Box 67
Main Number: 828-682-6148
Emergency Phone: 828-682-2124
Fax Number: 828-682-6712

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